HowTo create a JDBC provider with wsadmin scripting – Jython

Last week I wrote a post about creating MQQueues with jacl. However today I am moving to Jython. This is the new scripting languauge supported by the wsadmin. The following write-up helps you create a JDBC provider using Jython in 6 easy steps on the wsadmin console.

Pre requirements:
Following should be known to start using this tutorial.

1. How to launch the wsadmin with Jython enabled.

Where will I find the wsadmin?
It is typically placed in the bin directory of your server.
In my case its lying in my RAD installation directory as
../Rational/SDP/6.0/runtimes/base_v6/bin

To invoke the wasadmin, just open your terminal and move to the bin dir where you can simply call it by typing wsadmin -lang jython. By doing so you would be invoking the default profile. if you want to specify the profile then use the switch -profileName YOURPROFILENAME

You can either paste the commands step by step or store the whole code listing in one file like DataSources.py. This means you can run this with wsadmin by specifying the -f switch.

After the wsadmin console is launched we can now move to creating the provider step by step.

STEP 1.
Identify classpath for the provider. This is a path to the jar files that need to be used by the provider. In our case its a jdbc dirver for oracle.

driverPath = 'C:\lib\ojdbc14.jar'

STEP 2.
Identify the node and cell that will hold this provider. Node/Cell is how websphere is organized. As the Provider will be created inside a node we need to know which node we are working with.

cellName=AdminControl.getCell()
nodeName=AdminControl.getNode()
node = AdminConfig.getid('/Cell:%s/Node:%s/' % (cellName,nodeName))

In the code above first we get the NodeName and CellName of the current connected server and then take the reference of it as node.

STEP 3.
Specify a template, In our case we have taken an ‘Oracle JDBC Driver (XA)’ template.
The following command will list the template for the provider specified and store it in a variable ‘providerTemplate’

providerTemplate=AdminConfig.listTemplates('JDBCProvider', 'Oracle JDBC Driver (XA)')

STEP 4.
The name for our provider. It could be any name you want to give your provider.

providerName = ['name', 'Oracle JDBC Driver (XA)']

Implementation class and classpath for driver.
It is important to give the implementation class for our provider. In some cases they can be different in ours we use the default one.

implClassName = ['implementationClassName', 'oracle.jdbc.xa.client.OracleXADataSource']

STEP 5.
The following code will just put all the above variables into a form expected by wsadmin as a temp variable jdbcAttrs.

classpath = ['classpath',driverPath]
jdbcAttrs = [providerName,  implClassName,classpath]

STEP 6.

Now is the time to create the provider. and the following will just do that. It passes the type of the provider, the node ref, the jdbcAttrs created in step 5 and the template to be used to create the provider.

provider  = AdminConfig.createUsingTemplate('JDBCProvider', node, jdbcAttrs, providerTemplate)
AdminConfig.save()

This is pretty much it. You should now be able to see the provider in the AdminConsole.

Complete code listing is as follows

driverPath = 'C:\lib\ojdbc14.jar'
cellName=AdminControl.getCell()
nodeName=AdminControl.getNode()
providerTemplate=AdminConfig.listTemplates('JDBCProvider', 'Oracle JDBC Driver (XA)')
node = AdminConfig.getid('/Cell:%s/Node:%s/' % (cellName,nodeName))
 
providerName = ['name', 'Oracle JDBC Driver (XA)']
implClassName = ['implementationClassName', 'oracle.jdbc.xa.client.OracleXADataSource']
classpath = ['classpath',driverPath]
jdbcAttrs = [providerName,  implClassName,classpath]
provider  = AdminConfig.createUsingTemplate('JDBCProvider', node, jdbcAttrs, providerTemplate)
AdminConfig.save()

Creating an SVN wrap for your build using Ant

Today after along break I would jump right on to one of the interesting topics in my den these days.

One of my friends was lately troubled with doing some SVN stuff like merging etc. And a lot of people will agree with me on their first experiences. 🙂 I think.

While Automated builds take a lot of our time I thought I could plug in with some automated merging and a few other tasks. Its hard to go over all of that in one post but I will try putting in some basic stuff to get us started.

I call it the SVN Wrap.

Step 1.
Create a simple script file for wrapping svn and our environment.

A simple bat script could look like the following

@echo off
svn %*

However some people might want to add some environment variables to it. And that is where the strength of the this file comes in. You can tailor the environment dynamically!
e.g.

set LC_ALL=C
set SVN_HOME=svn-win32-1.4.6
set PATH=%SVN_HOME%\bin;%PATH%;

FYI: By setting LC_ALL I am telling the system I disregard the default locale. Its just used as an example here. for more information refer to the svnbook at http://svnbook.red-bean.com/

Step 2.
Create the build.xml
It doesnt get simpler then this.

I have created a project with the name CI-Test

<project name="CI-Test" default="status" basedir=".">
	<description>
		This is a POC for SVN Wrap.
	</description>
</project>

Importantly I am setting a property local.branch so that I can tell svn where my code has been checked out locally.

And finally the target that will take a status of the branch. for more details on the status command you could go here.

In general this target will give a general overview of the files and thier state at the moment.

	<target name="status">
		<echo message="Following is the status for this tree."/>
		<echo message="output is logged here: status.out" />
	          <exec dir="${local.branch}" executable="ci-svn.bat" output="status.out">
            		<arg line="status"/>
          	</exec>
	</target>

With in the target there are a few echo commands but the key construct is the exec.
The exec is going to do the following

dir=”${local.branch}” – would meant execute the command in this directory
executable=”ci-svn.bat” – Identifies the executable
and finally the output attribute to show where the output of this activity goes.
The following line will pass the parameters to the executable
< arg line=”status” />
And in this case its sending a status command to svn.

For more details on exec goto. http://ant.apache.org/manual/

Now I would presume both these files in saved in one direcotry as

1. ci-svn.bat
2. build.xml

To run this simply goto your command console and once in the same directory execute by running
ant

It is assumed that all paths to java,ant and svn are set on your console or system.

As an output you should be able to see a status.out in the same directory from where you executed ant.

Hopefully this should get you started with doing some bit of svn commands from ant. And that just opens a lot of more possibilities in your build environment.

The complete code listing of the build file is as follows.

<project name="CI-Test" default="status" basedir=".">
	<description>
		This is a POC for SVN Wrap.
	</description>
 
	<property name="local.branch" value="C:\branches\my-branch"/>
 
	<target name="status">
		<echo message="Following is the status for this tree."/>
		<echo message="output is logged here: status.out" />
	          <exec dir="${local.branch}" executable="ci-svn.bat" output="status.out">
            		<arg line="status"/>
          	</exec>
	</target>
 
</project>

Creating the MQQueues with wsadmin scripting – JACL Part 2

Yesterday I wrote an article about creating and configuring the MQQueueConnectionFactory with the JACL on the wsadmin console. The other half of the article that was left out was to create the queues also.

The world looks pretty much the same today and my /etc/profile doesnt seemed to have been sourced again. Good we dont need a restart.

You would find some of the steps to be similar and that is because we are running on the same configs.

Step 1.
Identify the Provider for your Queue. By default this is the name for it. If you have created a new provider with a different name then specify it here.

set tmp1 "WebSphere MQ JMS Provider"

Step 2.
Now you would need to find the CELL NAME and the NODE NAME of your server
A typical location to my websphere profile’s Node configuration file is as follows
C:\Programs\IBM\Rational\SDP\6.0\runtimes\base_v6\profiles\test_wsp\config\cells\BNode05Cell\nodes\BNode05
The cell name in this location is after \cells\ i.e. BNode05Cell
And the node name is at the end after \nodes\ i.e. BNode05

set newjmsp [$AdminConfig getid /Cell:CELLNAMECell/Node:NODENAME/JMSProvider:$tmp1/]

Step 3.
You would now need to set the attributes that go into the queue.

To see all the attributes you can simply run the following command

$AdminConfig [required|attributes] MQQueue

i.e. required or attributes

The attributes that I will be setting in the following commands are
name, jndiName, baseQueueName, targetClient

set name [list name NAME]
set jndi [list jndiName jms/jndiName]
set baseQN [list baseQueueName BASEQUEUENAME]
set targetclient [list targetClient MQ]

You can see in the above example the target client is set to MQ it can be JMS based on your configuration.

Step 4.
Now set all parameters in one string so that they can be passed to the command as one.

set mqqAttrs [list $name $jndi $baseQN $targetclient]

Step 5.
Now to create the MQQueue use the following command. This will add the Queue to the node and cell mentioned earlier in step 2.

$AdminConfig create MQQueue $newjmsp $mqqAttrs

Once it is created it is not saved and only stays in the current session. So to save it run the following command. And you should be all set.

$AdminConfig save

You can alternatively also save this script in a file on your local system. And run it by passing it to the wasadmin. Follwing is a sample command.

wsadmin -profileName test_wsp -f $SCRIPT_FILENAME_LOCATION$

‘Complete code listing is as follows.

set tmp1 "WebSphere MQ JMS Provider"
 
set newjmsp [$AdminConfig getid /Cell:HOSTNAMENode04Cell/Node:HOSTNAMENode04/JMSProvider:$tmp1/]
 
set name [list name Q.REPLY]
set jndi [list jndiName jms/Q.REPLY]
set baseQN [list baseQueueName Q.SYSTEM]
set targetclient [list targetClient MQ]
set mqqAttrs [list $name $jndi $baseQN $targetclient]
 
$AdminConfig create MQQueue $newjmsp $mqqAttrs
 
$AdminConfig save

Creating the MQQueueConnectionFactory with wsadmin scripting – JACL Part 1.

While working my way in some piece of long java code I came across this huge pile of sand that just shattered me off every bit of patience I was left with. The dilemma all of us face every second day. CONFIGURATIONS!!

While my sarcastic mind was just saying Congratulations to me instead. And just how the – would you expect me to start configuring now.

So what exactly is my problem? I have a list of MQs, Factories, datasource, providers etc.. that I need to configure. And every time I create a new profile on my RAD (Rational Application Developer) I have to manually goto the Admin console and configure them.

With the very useless bit of linux I am acquainted too I cant live with clicks at least while programming.

As I am working with websphere and its a biggy in all those names I thought the guys would be smart and would at least have something in the box for *people like me. Well guess what I was right.

IBM has provided two languages for scripting.

1. JACL
2. Jython

If I am not wrong JACL will be deprecated out in future releases and Jython would be the tool for our scripting bit. [ Link here ]

In this article I will just go briefly with JACL and move to Jython in the next version where we will be able to configure the data sources in the websphere.

So what exactly is JACL. or pronounced as “JACKAL”

Jacl, Java Command Language, is much like/version of the Tcl scripting language for the Java. It runs on the JVM much like we hear about JRuby and the interpreter is written completely in Java.

For more details on the language itself you could go [ here ]

Lets get down to business: How to create a Webspehere MQ Connection Factory with wsamdin using JACL.
You would already have some of the details of the queues but some you will need to extract.

Step 1.
Identify the Provider for your Factory. By default this is the name for it. If you have created a new provider with a different name then specify it here.

set tmp1 "WebSphere MQ JMS Provider"

Step 2.
Now you would need to find the CELL NAME and the NODE NAME of your server
A typical location to my websphere profile’s Node configuration file is as follows
C:\Programs\IBM\Rational\SDP\6.0\runtimes\base_v6\profiles\test_wsp\config\cells\BNode05Cell\nodes\BNode05
The cell name in this location is after \cells\ i.e. BNode05Cell
And the node name is at the end after \nodes\ i.e. BNode05

set newjmsp [$AdminConfig getid /Cell:CELLNAMECell/Node:NODENAME/JMSProvider:$tmp1/]

Step 3.
Now you need to specify the Factories properties.

The properties I plan to setup are as follows.
Name, jndiName,QueueManager, sname, port, channel, ttype, xaenabled

To check what are the required parameters for the Factory you can run the following command on the wsadmin console.

$AdminConfig required WASQueueConnectionFactory

Example output:

wsadmin $AdminConfig required WASQueueConnectionFactory
Attribute                       Type
name                            String
jndiName                        String

Where will I find the wsadmin?
It is typically placed in the bin directory of your server.
In my case its lying in my RAD installation directory as
../Rational/SDP/6.0/runtimes/base_v6/bin

To invoke the wasadmin, just open your terminal and move to the bin dir where you can simply call it by typing wsadmin.  By doing so you would be invoking the default profile. if you want to specify the profile then use the switch -profileName YOURPROFILENAME

To see the all parameters required and optional write the following command on the console.

$AdminConfig attributes WASQueueConnectionFactory

Example output:

wsadmin $AdminConfig attributes WASQueueConnectionFactory
"XAEnabled boolean"
"authDataAlias String"
"authMechanismPreference ENUM(BASIC_PASSWORD, KERBEROS)"
"category String"
"connectionPool ConnectionPool"
"description String"
"jndiName String"
"logMissingTransactionContext boolean"
"manageCachedHandles boolean"
"mapping MappingModule"
"name String"
"node String"
"preTestConfig ConnectionTest"
"propertySet J2EEResourcePropertySet"
"provider J2EEResourceProvider@"
"providerType String"
"serverName String"
"sessionPool ConnectionPool"
"xaRecoveryAuthAlias String"

I have added some extra optional parameters for those of us who are using extra options.

set name [list name NAME]
 
set jndi [list jndiName jms/JNDINAME]
 
set qManager [list queueManager QMANAGER]
 
set sname [list host HOSTNAME]
 
set port [list port 1414]
 
set channel [list channel CHANNEL]
 
set ttype [list transportType CLIENT]
 
set xa [list XAEnabled True|false]

Step 4.
Now set all parameters in one string so that they can be passed to the command as one.

set mqcfAttrs [list $name $jndi $qManager $sname $port $channel $ttype $xa]

Step 5.
Now to create the Factory use the following command. This will add the factory to the node and cell mentioned earlier in step 2.

$AdminConfig create MQQueueConnectionFactory $newjmsp $mqcfAttrs

Once it is created it is not saved and only stays in the current session. So to save it run the following command. And you should be all set.

$AdminConfig save

You can alternatively also save this script in a file on your local system. And run it by passing it to the wasadmin. Follwing is a sample command.

wsadmin -profileName test_wsp -f $SCRIPT_FILENAME_LOCATION$

Complete code listing is as follows.

set tmp1 "WebSphere MQ JMS Provider"
 
set newjmsp [$AdminConfig getid /Cell:CELLNAMECell/Node:NODENAME/JMSProvider:$tmp1/]
 
set name [list name NAME]
 
set jndi [list jndiName jms/JNDINAME]
 
set qManager [list queueManager QMANAGER]
 
set sname [list host HOSTNAME]
 
set port [list port 1414]
 
set channel [list channel CHANNEL]
 
set ttype [list transportType CLIENT]
 
set xa [list XAEnabled false]
 
set mqcfAttrs [list $name $jndi $qManager $sname $port $channel $ttype $xa]
 
$AdminConfig create MQQueueConnectionFactory $newjmsp $mqcfAttrs
 
$AdminConfig save

More Resources:

[http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/wasinfo/v6r1/index.jsp?topic=/com.ibm.websphere.nd.doc/info/ae/ae/rmig_deprecationlist.html]

[http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/imshelp1/v3r0/index.jsp?topic=/com.ibm.sif.doc/jaclabout.html]

 

Imaging and filters

Image processing has always been one of the my favourite and talked about subjects and un doubtly it is one of the most interesting bits of computer science that exist. For some it is a challenge to talk about, a few would term it as virtually impossible and a few would be developing applications from secure government projects to a simplistic robots. Image processing by far remains one of the most sophisticated technologies in the world today. The use of it can be seen in laboratories, industrial applications and also a few personal computing applications. Either we are using Document processing or scanning images; watching an assembly line guided by robots or using satellites is all that relates to image processing. Today image processing is part of our lives and for some a success story. Image processing is one field that is always taking its mark towards new ideas and innovations. My interest grows more every time I read something about Image processing and I write about it today. I had done a small project back in school with some hefty amounts of research, Ironically my career did not start off in a research lab just as I would have liked it to be but thats the “bit” we all try to understand *Try*, everyday. 🙂 At that time my ultimate aim had been to choose an application that brings knowledge not only to me but also to my fellow colleagues, students of Asia Pacific Institute of Information Technology, friends and to give me a solid position in order to research further and probably in a laboratory fulfilling realities of science fiction.

Attached is a PDF [Imaging and Filters] of the extract. This piece of murky english that stays in my backup CD drives should be atleast out here in the virtual space. Maybe some one might benefit from my very little understanding of the matter.

Following are some really nice reosurces to start your day with Image procesing  😉

Rerources:

1. [HIPR2] 2002 http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/HIPR2/hipr_top.htm
2. [Andy Salter] MSc Computing Science degree at Imperial College, Spline Curves
and Surfaces http://www.doc.ic.ac.uk/%7Edfg/AndysSplineTutorial/index.html.
3. [NEC] site ceer, http://citeseer.nj.nec.com
4. [Dr. Douglas A Lyon] 1999, Image Processing in java
5. [Dr. Douglas A Lyon] 1999, Morphological Filtering.
6. [Dr. Douglas A Lyon] 1999, Transformation and chromaticity.
7. R.-L. Hsu, M. Abdel-Mottaleb, and A. K. Jain, “Face detection in color images,”
IEEE Trans. Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, vol. 24, no. 5, pp. 696-
706, May 2002. [PDF, TPAMI Journal paper]
<http://www.cse.msu.edu/~hsureinl/facloc/tpami113783_.pdf> [Hsu et Al.]
8. [JAI] 1997 Sun Microsystems. http://www.java.sun.com
9. [Java 2d] 1996 Sun Microsystems. http://www.java.sun.com
10. Object Detection Using the Statistics of Parts
H. Schneiderman and T. Kanade
International Journal of Computer Vision, 2002. [Abstract]
11. A histogram-based method for detection of faces and cars
H. Schneiderman and T. Kanade
Proceedings of the 2000 International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP ’00),
Vol. 3, September, 2000, pp. 504 – 507. [Abstract]
12. A Statistical Model for 3D Object Detection Applied to Faces and Cars
H. Schneiderman and T. Kanade
IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, IEEE, June,
2000. [Abstract]
Bsc (Hons) Final Year Computing Appendix
Asia Pacific Institute of Information Technology 129
13. A Statistical Approach to 3D Object Detection Applied to Faces and Cars
H. Schneiderman
doctoral dissertation, tech. report 00-06, Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon
University, May, 2000. [Abstract]
14. Probabilistic Modeling of Local Appearance and Spatial Relationships for Object
Recognition
H. Schneiderman and T. Kanade
Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern
Recognition (CVPR ’98), July, 1998, pp. 45-51. [Abstract]
15. Object Recognition by Computer: The Role of Geometric Constraints. Cambridge,
MA: MIT Press.Grimson, W. E. L. (1990).
16. Comparing images using the Hausdorff distance. IEEE Transactions on Pattern
Analysis and Machine Intelligence 15(9):850-863. Huttenlocher, D. P., G. A.
Klanderman, and W. J. Rucklidge. (1993).
17. On recognizing and positioning curved 3-D objects from image contours. IEEE
Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence 12:1127-1137.
Kriegman, D. J., and J. Ponce. (1990).
18. [Gregory A Baxus] 1994, Shape Measurements, Digital Image Processing
19. [Gregory A Baxus] 1994, Image Operation Studies
20. [Donald Hearn] and [M Pauline Baker] 1994, Computer Graphics

Quick start Singleton – Walk through

This being my first existence on the network and I just want to make sure that I would come back to this blog page again sometime and keep on writing. For now this is a quick 5 min walk through of getting your hands dirty on the Singleton Pattern. As any ones first pattern Singleton always seems to be the easiest to adapt and ironically always the mistress of your pains; when you realize the act wasn’t right in the first place.
More details on that later.

This post should help you to get your hands right on the Singleton Pattern and find the kind there off.

Like any other pattern Singleton also has an objective behind it. What is that?

Motivation:

A Singleton ensures that a class has only one instance, and provides a global point of access to that class.

Benefits
The very simple benefits of a singleton can be:

* Controlled access
* Permits a variable number of instances
* Reduced name space

When to use:
There must be exactly once instance of a class

How to use: Walk Through

1. Create a class

  1. public class SimplySingleton{}

2. Declare a member variable. This variable will be used for keeping the singleton instance.

It has to be private so that it is not accessible from anywhere else. It has to be static so that it holds only one instance in all entirety.

  1. private static SimplySingleton simplySingleton = null;

3. Declare a private constructor.

Creating a private constructor would mean no one else can instantiate this class.

  1. private SimplySingleton(){}

4. So now everything seems private how do we access it. Create a global access point.

  1. public static SimplySingleton getInstance(){}

How would I access it from outside SimplySingleton.getInstance();

This method should return a SimplySingleton instance.

So here comes the logic to create the one and only instance.

  1. // 4a. is the variable null?
  2. if(simplySingleton != null)
  3. return simplySingleton;
  4. // 4b. if not assign it an instance.
  5. else return simplySingleton = new SimplySingleton();

Following is the complete code listing for writing a Singleton.

  1. // Declaring the class
  2. public class SimplySingleton {
  3.  
  4. // 1. a private and a static member variable
  5.  
  6. private static SimplySingleton simplySingleton = null;
  7.  
  8. // 2. a private constructor
  9.  
  10. private SimplySingleton(){}
  11.  
  12. // 3. a global access point
  13.  
  14. public static SimplySingleton getInstance(){
  15. // 4a. is the variable null?
  16. if(simplySingleton != null)
  17. return simplySingleton;
  18. // 4b. if not assign it an instance.
  19. else return simplySingleton = new SimplySingleton();
  20. }
  21.  
  22. }

Following are some good resources for in depth peek into the Singleton Pattern.

More Resources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singleton_pattern

http://radio.weblogs.com/0122027/stories/2003/10/20/implementingTheSingletonPatternInJava.html

http://www.oodesign.com/singleton-pattern.html

http://www.oaklib.org/docs/oak/singleton.html